Week in Review November 6 – 10

  • The National Council on Independent Living (NCIL) and ADAPT have announced a National Organizing Project.
    • The project is drawing upon disability advocacy successes from this past summer and around healthcare legislation.
    • ADAPT is one of the preeminent direct action advocacy groups in the U.S.  Learn more about them at ADAPT.
    • This partnership will support new ADAPT chapters throughout the country, training for advocates/organizers, and policy development.
    • Learn more about the National Organizing Project.
  • With Republican tax reform looming, here are some existing federal tax deductions and credits that benefit people with disabilities.
    • The first is the Architectural and Transportation Barrier Removal Deduction
      • In order to make existing facilities/public transportation vehicles accessible, businesses are eligible for up to $15,000 annual deduction.
      • Examples: providing accessible parking spaces, ramps, and curb cuts, or providing accessible restrooms for people in wheelchairs
      • All eligible expenses are outlined in Section 190 regulations of the tax code
      • For more information, check out this website:
    • Another current tax credit that small businesses should know about is called the Disabled Access Tax Credit.
      • Business with 30 or fewer employees or that earn $1 million or less can get a non-refundable tax credit for up to $5,000 for expenditures to make their businesses more accessible to people with disabilities.
      • This credit will cover up to 50% of the expenditures needed for the project
      • Examples: providing sign language interpreters, purchasing adaptive equipment or modifying existing equipment, removing barriers in facilities, etc.
      • In order to qualify, it requires a specific form (8826) to be filed.
      • It can be used in conjunction with the Architectural and Transportation Barrier Removal Tax Deduction.
      • For more information, check out this website.
    • Another current tax deduction for people with disabilities is called the Standard Deduction for People Who Are Blind
      • If your uncorrected visual acuity is worse than 20/200 or your visual field is less than 20 degrees, you can increase your standard deduction on your federal income taxes.
      • In 2017 this amounts to an addition $1,550 for non-dependent single filers or $1,250 for non dependent married filers.
  • For more information, contact Kevin Koziol at kkoziol@cildrc.org.

 

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